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The only diet you can stick with is one you can enjoy1h 23m The only diet you can stick with is one you can enjoy
Dry January, Veganuary … when it all gets a bit much, reach for something simple like shepherd’s pie or mushroom soup By the time you read this, it will all be over: the advice about what to do in January. Either you’ll still be sticking to your resolutions, food- and exercise-wise, or you will have already abandoned them – unless, like me, you didn’t make any, for which reason you will be currently neither glowing nor guilty. Regular readers will know that I like nothing more than to sit atop my spike; after the holidays, I could hardly wait to get back to work. But I also find the winter hard enough without depriving myself of things. Still, it was worse than ever this year: the advice, I mean. We were assailed from all sides,
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Rise and shine: five brilliant brunch recipes2h Rise and shine: five brilliant brunch recipes
Perfect dishes for lazy weekends: frittata with bacon salad, crepes with egg and ham, apple and custard brioche buns Buckwheat flour is one of my favourite flours to bake with, it goes with both savoury and sweet so the toppings or fillings for these crepes are endless. This will probably make a few more crepes than you need but the mixture keeps well in the fridge for up to a week.
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Tamal Ray’s recipe for date traybake with toffee | The Sweet Spot6h Tamal Ray’s recipe for date traybake with toffee | The Sweet Spot
A luxuriant cake with gentle fruit flavours complemented by a rich toffee topping There are times where cooking feels like both science and magic. Take, for example, the date toffee at the heart of this recipe. There’s science here, of course – the caramelisation of sugars and emulsification of fats – but it feels more like magic, with three disparate ingredients bubbling away like a brewing potion to give something altogether different and uniquely delicious: a luxuriously rich but delicately fruity toffee. Or perhaps I’m overthinking it and just need to read a bit less sci-fi and fantasy this year.
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Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for tofu katsu sado with celeriac and apple slaw | The new vegan7h Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for tofu katsu sado with celeriac and apple slaw | The new vegan
A fried tofu cutlet slathered with curried ‘mayo’ and covered in an eye-opening slaw – this is how to make sandwiches exciting My life can be carved into two parts: a time before katsu sando and the enlightened after period. It’s hard for a sandwich, the lunchtime stalwart, to break ranks and become exciting and even famous, but it’s easy to see how this Japanese take on it has done just that.
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Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipes for slow-cooked vegetables8h Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipes for slow-cooked vegetables
Watch your humble vegetables transform into luxurious delicacies after a warm bath in oil and aromatics Slow-cooking in fat, or confiting, to use the fancy term, is usually associated with meat (or for preserving fruit in sugar syrup). For me, however, vegetables are the biggest winners from a long, warm bath of oil and aromatics. In the process (which isn’t actually that long with veg), they tenderise and soak up a bunch of flavours that make them rich, unctuous and delicious. It’s a total transformation of something mild and humble into something rich and luxurious. All they then need is a spot of acidity or a touch of heat, and you’ve got glorious vegetables, reimagined, on the table.
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The fry-up may be toast – but, much to my own surprise, I don’t really care | Tony Naylor10h The fry-up may be toast – but, much to my own surprise, I don’t really care | Tony Naylor
The full breakfast has been declared dead many times. But this time reports of its demise are, perhaps, not exaggeratedIn the 1980s, there was only one meal that mattered to me: Sunday breakfast. A break from monotonous cereal or toast, my dad’s full breakfast was the highlight of the food week. True, his signature dish (naturally, this was the only time he cooked), would not have flown at the
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Four recipes for hearty vegan soups | Annie Bell11h Four recipes for hearty vegan soups | Annie Bell
Four filling, plant-based winter soups for vegans and omnivores alike – broccoli and quinoa, cauli and lime, chickpea and chard, and lentils with artichoke Prep
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We’re struggling with Veganuary – where should we shop?11h We’re struggling with Veganuary – where should we shop?
We need tips from vegans as we sometimes need pre-prepared or quick-to-make meals
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How to make the most of a glut of rhubarb | Waste Not12h How to make the most of a glut of rhubarb | Waste Not
Rhubarb season is upon us again, as is the temptation to buy armfuls of the stuff. Use up any excess in novel condiments or add diced to chopped salads, or freeze into this vibrant granita In the depths of winter, the vegetables at the market tend to be various hues of emerald green, burnt umber, and beige or brown. Right around now, however, a punk-pink renegade breaks the mould and brings its celebratory fluorescence to the table. Forced rhubarb is tricked into an early harvest by being grown in warmed barns in an area of west Yorkshire known as
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Slip-up leaves priests rolling in the aisles | Brief letters25h Slip-up leaves priests rolling in the aisles | Brief letters
Oxford University | English usage | Noel Coward | Driving in cities | Flavoured crispsWe applaud the rise in state-sector intake across Oxford University and are glad to see individual colleges praised (
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Cocktail of the week: The Cutting Room’s apple crumble in a glass | The good mixer26h Cocktail of the week: The Cutting Room’s apple crumble in a glass | The good mixer
Like the quintessential British pudding so much you could drink it? Read on ... There’s a distinct whiff of just about everyone’s favourite British winter pudding in this seasonal cocktail, hence the name. It’s just a simple assembly job, too, with no flashy bartender tricks. Serves 1
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There’s more to Argentinian wines than malbec | Fiona Beckett28h There’s more to Argentinian wines than malbec | Fiona Beckett
Malbec is rightly loved for its juicy, rich character and versatility, but Argentina also produces great bottles with other varieties You know the conversations you have with infrequent visitors to the UK, who think we eat and drink nothing but fish and chips and warm beer? Well, it must be like that for the Argentinians, too, when we assume that they live off malbec and steak. (Although there is a shred of truth in that: I ate more beef in a week on a recent visit than I normally do in six months.) But, even though there’s obviously more to Argentinian wine than malbec, practically everyone I know loves it (which I’ll come on to next week), so why drink anything else? Well, the country makes some other great reds that the locals love and tend to drink right through a meal. There’s some really good cabernet sauvignon (honestly, the Bordelais must gnash their teeth with envy at the near-perfect growing conditions in Argentina) and some excellent cabernet francs (the up-and-coming grape variety). There are also delicate, silky pinot noirs; some interesting albeit less feted bonardas; and, as elsewhere, grenache is on the up.
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Anna Jones’ recipes for a winter soup and breakfast smoothie | The Modern Cook30h Anna Jones’ recipes for a winter soup and breakfast smoothie | The Modern Cook
Filling and healthy make-ahead recipes for a refreshing coriander and sweet potato soup, and a smoothie you can make the night before to kickstart your mornings Each year around mid-January, I crave a short period of simplicity in the food I eat; a reset of my palate and tastebuds. I’m not talking about a diet, as I don’t go in for those, but a short snap of eating simpler food to make me think about the eating habits I have built up. Like anyone else, I get into patterns and habits with food: some good, some bad, and driven as much by emotion as nutrition, so I do a reset to help me connect with what I am eating again. It breaks the habits I have fallen into and allows me to reconsider why I am eating, when I am eating and what really feels good for me and my body.
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