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Food on the frontline: finding common ground through cooking19m Food on the frontline: finding common ground through cooking
Giles Duley photographs people in war zones. More importantly he cooks and eats with them first Giles Duley, a 47-year-old photographer, is no stranger to some of the world’s most desperate places. His work on the impact of war has taken him to Lebanon, South Sudan, Ukraine and Afghanistan, where in 2011 he lost both legs and his left arm after stepping on a landmine. But his experience in Mosul, Iraq, in the spring of 2017, covering the fallout of the military campaign to retake the city from Islamic State, was something else. “I saw some of the worst things I’d ever seen in terms of war – just horrific things,” says Duley, shaking his head. “It was overwhelming and I came back in quite a dark place from that trip. It was shut the curtains, I don’t want to speak to anyone. And I just started cooking, I started making pasta and bread. I realised that was therapy for me, because when you’ve got those dark thoughts and you’ve seen children injured, you can put the television on or you can read a book, but you are still thinking about those things. You can’t get away from them. But I found cooking was the one time I did, because I think it’s the manual tasks: you are lost in that moment.
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Food after oil: how urban farmers are preparing us for a self-sufficient future49m Food after oil: how urban farmers are preparing us for a self-sufficient future
Bristol is at the head of a food phenomenon that is helping residents better connect with their cities and each other If you travel by train into Bristol from north of the city, there is a point two miles from the centre when you can catch sight of a tiny farmyard. Nestling at the bottom of a railway embankment between houses, builders yards and a car rental depot, it has sties, snoozing Gloucester Old Spot pigs, a paddock with caramel-coloured Dexter cattle grazing and vegetable plots in which you might see the farmer and her three young children at work. It is not, as you might assume, a visitor attraction. Founded on the council-owned site of a former market garden,
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Paint the town: an illustrated celebration of London shopfronts1h 19m Paint the town: an illustrated celebration of London shopfronts
From Italian delis to the city’s oldest coffee stall, Eleanor Crow’s new book documents small food businesses fighting for survival A lot of it was based on appearance,” says Eleanor Crow on choosing the food shops and cafes to draw for her new book,
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Frozen in time: Maya Angelou cooks for Toni Morrison, September 19941h 19m Frozen in time: Maya Angelou cooks for Toni Morrison, September 1994
To honour the author’s Nobel prize for literature, Angelou hosts a feast for 150 in her Winston-Salem home Maya Angelou stands in the kitchen of her birdcage-lined home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, preparing a feast for a crowd of 150. It is September 1994. She is 66. She stews crowder peas and okra, and grills a sturdy mass of baron of beef to honour two guests: Toni Morrison, who was awarded the Nobel prize for literature the year before, and who died a fortnight ago, and US poet laureate Rita Dove. The house on Bartram Road would be cleared of its birdcages after Angelou’s death in 2014. After she died, the world honoured her work as a poet, a playwright and a memoirist, paying scant attention to her formidable skills as a cook.
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Taste test: wines and cocktails in cans1h 49m Taste test: wines and cocktails in cans
Cookery writer Gizzi Erskine tastes and rates high-street sparkling rosés, mojitos and gins in tins
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The week in TV: Succession; Deep Water; Kathy Burke’s All Woman and more – review5h The week in TV: Succession; Deep Water; Kathy Burke’s All Woman and more – review
Brian Cox bosses the screen, and his family, as Succession returns, while ITV’s new Lake District drama intrigues
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Nigel Slater’s ice-cream recipes6h Nigel Slater’s ice-cream recipes
In this heat, it’s ice screamingly obvious what you need to do The summer staggers on. The air is hot and thick as treacle. There is no breeze, not a single leaf moves. For some, the summer of their dreams. For me, the perfect excuse to make ice-cream. To be honest, there has barely been a day when there hasn’t been at least two tubs in the freezer. Homemade vanilla or raspberry ripple, perhaps one made with roast plums, another with basil and lemon. Some have been made here in my kitchen (crème fraîche, lemon, a less than perfect pistachio), others have been rushed home from the shops. There have been wafers and cornets, sundaes and ice-cream sandwiches, and more than I care to admit eaten straight from the tub. A little sugar brings out the sweetness of the apricots, the lemon makes them sing
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A longing for Languedoc | David Williams6h A longing for Languedoc | David Williams
It’s an area of France not that well known for its white wines, but for good value, fresh whites the Languedoc in the southwest is well worth considering
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Bob Mortimer: ‘As a kid I’d put 17 spoons of sugar in my tea’19h Bob Mortimer: ‘As a kid I’d put 17 spoons of sugar in my tea’
The co-star of TV’s Gone Fishing remembers childhood diets, ‘pocket meat’ and getting married on the day of his heart op
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My neverending search for the perfect cup of coffee19h My neverending search for the perfect cup of coffee
Japanese filter sets, Italian espresso machines, vintage Bialettis – as hobbies go it’s extreme and expensive. Don’t judge me I’m about to go holiday, and though the prospect is delightful, one thing is worrying me: the coffee situation. For the last few years, a group of us have rented a big, old house somewhere in deepest France. It’s a place I love as much as anywhere I’ve ever stayed: you will know what I mean when I say that it’s the kind of house where you want only to read Colette, and eat apricots, and lie in the bath with a large glass of rosé while listening to Francoise Hardy (you might want to pretend that you
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Tamal Ray’s recipe for pistachio biscotti | The Sweet Spot25h Tamal Ray’s recipe for pistachio biscotti | The Sweet Spot
These pistachio and cherry biscotti are real keepers – they last a couple of months, if you can resist them There are few things more welcoming than walking into a cafe and being greeted by the sight of a shining jar of biscotti. The dough for this recipe, flavoured with honey and orange-blossom water, will be much wetter than you might expect. All will be saved by the second bake, however, with the water being driven out to give the crisp texture and long shelf life for which they are known.
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Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for courgette and chickpea dal | The New Vegan26h Meera Sodha’s vegan recipe for courgette and chickpea dal | The New Vegan
This spicy dal is a novel and simple way to use up a summer glut of courgettes There is high drama at this time of year, as peak courgette season kicks in and people start firing panicked messages at each other, looking for new ways to dispense with them before they (shock, horror) turn into marrows. I used to make courgette kofta a lot, but for quicker suppers, I either
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Thrice as nice: rice recipes from around the world | Yotam Ottolenghi27h Thrice as nice: rice recipes from around the world | Yotam Ottolenghi
Think you know rice? Try a Korean fusion starter of fritters, a vegetarian Cajun dirty rice and a southern US-style black rice and butternut squash main You’ve found the perfect water-to-rice ratio for making pilaf; your technique is faultless, your execution spot-on. But now you’re staring down at a bag of short-grain brown rice, not basmati, and the game has changed: from soaking, to salting, to cooking. Rice is an ingredient with multiple personality types: just when you think you’ve figured it out, you’re met with another variety, another size, shape or colour. Not to mention its purpose: as the main event, a textural addition, a binding agent or to bulk out a meal.
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Four summer jam recipes | Kylee Newton29h Four summer jam recipes | Kylee Newton
Store up the sunshine for the leaner months in homemade jams of peach and lemon thyme, gooseberry and camomile, raspberry and cacao, or a strawberry and lemon marmalade Before you start on any of these jams, sterilise jars and lids. Wash them in hot, soapy water and rinse well. Drip-dry upside down, then put in an oven heated to 100C (90C fan)/gas ¼ for at least 20 minutes. Meanwhile, put a few small plates in the freezer in preparation for the “wrinkle test.” Sealed, the jam will keep for up to 12 months. Once opened, keep refrigerated and eat within three months.
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Surprising uses for radish leaves | Waste Not30h Surprising uses for radish leaves | Waste Not
There are many tasty uses for these greens - in soups, sauces, dals or instead of spinach in a bake Radish leaves are one of my favourite leafy greens. They have a refreshing, summery flavour that’s perfect for blending into soups or eating raw in salads. The leaves perish very quickly, which is why they are usually removed at the farm. When you buy whole radishes, remove the leaves as soon as you get home and use them within 24 hours. After a good wash, they can be eaten like any leafy green and are quite splendid wilted in a little butter. You can also blend them into
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