Back Food & Drink Sunday, October 20, 2019
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OFM Awards 2019: Lifetime achievement – Claudia Roden11h OFM Awards 2019: Lifetime achievement – Claudia Roden
The recipes she has collected for nearly 60 years have inspired today’s chefs and brought a world of new flavours into our homes Someone once told Claudia Roden that she couldn’t write about Jewish food because there was no such thing. Her response, in 1999’s
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OFM Awards 2019: Best food personality – Jamie Oliver11h OFM Awards 2019: Best food personality – Jamie Oliver
‘I’m a bit battered and bruised, but I’m optimistic,’ says the campaigning chef who has been voted by OFM readers as their personality of the year Jamie Oliver has had a year. It was a year that kicked him into a bush then pulled him through it slowly, and he’ll talk about how that felt, yes, but first, he wants to discuss something more important, which is how to save the world. We are sitting in the grand warehouse of the Jamie Oliver offices in north London, where today’s staff lunch is pappardelle with dried porcini and thyme in a mascarpone and tomato sauce. Their in-house barista is employed through a social enterprise staffed by the homeless, and a huge sign by the door reads “BRAVE”. The atmosphere is more that of a bohemian family home than the headquarters of a multi-million-pound food empire – Oliver has no office, instead he takes meetings here, on the sofa, casual as pizza, a jaunty little scarf around his neck, a tired flicker in his eye.
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OFM Awards 2019: Outstanding achievement – Refugee Community Kitchen11h OFM Awards 2019: Outstanding achievement – Refugee Community Kitchen
They’ve served 2.3m meals to refugees in France and the UK’s homeless. The winners of this year’s award, chosen by our panel of judges, explain why they had to do what they do At 5.30pm, two unmarked white vans swing in to the car park of Puythouck, a nature reserve on the outskirts of Dunkirk, northern France. A couple of dozen men are waiting for them, but within a minute or two, many more emerge, like spirits, from the dense trees that surround the lake. Soon there are maybe 200. They are, I’ll find out, mainly Kurds and remarkably, considering the journeys they have taken and their present accommodation, most are in buoyant mood and well turned out. Only when you look closer do you notice that a disproportionate number are limping and a couple are on crutches; injuries picked up as they attempted to escape this place and find a better life.
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OFM Awards 2019: Best Sunday lunch – The Bank Tavern, Bristol11h OFM Awards 2019: Best Sunday lunch – The Bank Tavern, Bristol
At this cosy city centre pub – voted by OFM readers as their favourite Sunday lunch spot – you might catch the landlord hauling in a deer or enjoy great vegetables from a regular’s allotment
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Nigel Slater’s crab and harissa croquettes and white chocolate and lemon buns recipes11h Nigel Slater’s crab and harissa croquettes and white chocolate and lemon buns recipes
Delicious bite-sized morsels, savoury and sweet I go on about the pleasures of sharing, but there is something appealing about having a little something to yourself. A golden croquette, hot from the pan, to wolf in one go. Or perhaps a dainty bun of choux pastry filled with cream, its surface tacky with chocolate fondant… I splashed out on some dressed crab this week, padded out the snow-white needles of flesh with a few breadcrumbs, rolled them into balls and deep fried the lot. Toothsome, an old fashioned and totally appropriate word for a crisp morsel of crab with the faintest hint of brick-red harissa, but you couldn’t really think of them as a meal. We passed a batch of them round in a basket while drinking beers and eating thin slices of deep maroon, fat-marbled ham. No forks were necessary, although a napkin or two wouldn’t have gone amiss. Should you feel they would make supper, roll each one into the size of a plump scallop and serve with a tangle of green beans, lightly steamed then tossed in a shallow pan of finely chopped bacon and its glorious fat.
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Notes on chocolate: travel the world a bite at a time | Annalisa Barbieri11h Notes on chocolate: travel the world a bite at a time | Annalisa Barbieri
From harissa and tahini to Sussex pudding, Paul A Young chocolates are a journey into the unknown The beauty of knowing a city is that you know where to venture beyond the high street. One of
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Flor, Borough Market, London: ‘I feel like I’ve been at a tasting session’ – restaurant review15h Flor, Borough Market, London: ‘I feel like I’ve been at a tasting session’ – restaurant review
Despite opening to great fanfare, many of the dishes at Flor seem at odds with the hype – and some seem downright weird
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Chilean wines that excel at every price point16h Chilean wines that excel at every price point
Always fruity, authentic and dependable, sometimes these South Americans really shine
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Questlove: bagels with Amy Winehouse, fish and chips with the Roots29h Questlove: bagels with Amy Winehouse, fish and chips with the Roots
The drummer and frontman on food and music, his friendship with Anthony Bourdain and much, much more
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Meera Sodha’s family recipe for Gujarati tomato curry | The New Vegan36h Meera Sodha’s family recipe for Gujarati tomato curry | The New Vegan
From western India via Uganda comes this vegan curry made irresistable when topped with crunchy fried noodles known as sev This is an ancient Gujarati dish from the
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From coconut curry to hoppel poppel: Yotam Ottolenghi’s family recipes36h From coconut curry to hoppel poppel: Yotam Ottolenghi’s family recipes
A diverse heritage has led to Yotam’s eclectic toolkit of international hand-me-down recipes, from Germany via the American Midwest to Malaysia The food legacy handed down to me by my parents is probably best embodied by hoppel poppel, a leftovers dish featuring potato, onion, sausage and egg, all mixed together into a glorious hodgepodge. It’s a kind-of bubble and squeak, and comes from my mother’s German heritage but, with pork sausage at its core, it couldn’t be more distasteful to the two other cultures that dominated my early years in Israel: Jewish and Arabic. It also didn’t work at all for my father, a proud Italian and a master of refined understatement in the kitchen. The beauty of today, though, is that I get to choose my childhood favourites from a whole range of formidable and delicious traditions.
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How to turn onion skins into an on-trend ingredient | Waste Not40h How to turn onion skins into an on-trend ingredient | Waste Not
You may not be dyeing your underpants with onion skins any time soon – though you could – but this onion skin ash adds a smoky flavour to all sorts of dishes My first job in a commercial kitchen was with a veteran hotel chef called John. He knew all the tricks, but also when to do things properly. Each Sunday, we made stock in a vast pot that would simmer on the stove, full of bones, trotters, herb stalks and onion skins. Once ready, it was reduced to a thick gravy and used as a base for many of our sauces. Traditional recipes such as that stock are one way to reduce our waste, but we can also do so in other ways. Babs Behan, my friend and author of
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